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AiM MXL2 with or without H2O/Oil separate pressure gauges?

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#1
Sphinx

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I'm running an AiM dash.  Currently the car has a separate water temp and oil pressure gauges in the two bug-eye vents in the center of the dash.  Should I get rid of them and integrate everything into the AiM?  Or should I keep separate gauges?  The two gauges do feed data into the AiM presently.  But the dash is having to get rewired due to damage to the dash wiring harness - so, it's a chance to do it the way it ought to be, rather than simply accepting the current configuration.

 

Would be interested in thoughts from the experienced folks.



#2
TrailBrake

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I would say to remove them. You can display the temp and pressure values on the dash if you want, but I would advocate for well defined alarms and to not every worry about the actual number.  I did a webinar with AiM on configuring the alarms and give some good ideas on how to set them 


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#3
Sphinx

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I would say to remove them. You can display the temp and pressure values on the dash if you want, but I would advocate for well defined alarms and to not every worry about the actual number.  I did a webinar with AiM on configuring the alarms and give some good ideas on how to set them

 

That's a good point.  I guess I was worried about overloading the AiM with hard to see mousetype when i could have these large visuals.

 

So, you don't see value in looking at the status of a temp guage, for example?  Or a oil pressure behavior at WOT?  What values would you set for these warning lights?

 

Is there a way to select AiM templates that's easier to access than the display?  From an ergonomics perspective, seems awkward to manipulate during a session.  is there a remote switch to select templates?



#4
Steve Scheifler

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I could argue either side but once installed would keep both. I do want the easy and familiar visual of current status and how things respond to revs, temp, whatever and changes through a session or day. The data system is good for recording that to look at later and for screaming at me to pull out my credit card when it’s probably too late, but my old brain is comforted by familiar real-time feedback.
Bona fide - A bonafide Spec Miata driver

#5
TrailBrake

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So hear is my thought. You can take all the things you would want to watch a gauge for and then make it an alarm. For instance, I have alarms (not in a Miata) for RPM over 500 and oil pressure under 10 psi, RPM over 3,000 and oil pressure under 30 psi, etc. You can set as many as you want. So, then if the RPM to oil pressure correlation isn't correct, you get a light. No need to watch it while driving (you have better things to do!). If there is no light, you can still go to the data and review it. Plus, you then have a record of the temps and pressures for the season and life of the motor to see if the pressure is dropping as the engine ages. 

You can also set yellow lights for warnings. Riding in the draft and coolant starts to get warm - yellow light and a message for what it means. Then you can work on cooling the motor and getting some air. Then their is a red light for too hot, you have to act now. Or maybe it's the last lap, you're in the lead, and it's now a trophy motor!

 

My general plan is to make well thought out alarms so that I can focus on driving and not trying to see what a gauge is doing. If it works for fighter pilots, F1, etc, it will work for me.


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#6
Sphinx

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So hear is my thought. You can take all the things you would want to watch a gauge for and then make it an alarm. For instance, I have alarms (not in a Miata) for RPM over 500 and oil pressure under 10 psi, RPM over 3,000 and oil pressure under 30 psi, etc. You can set as many as you want. So, then if the RPM to oil pressure correlation isn't correct, you get a light. No need to watch it while driving (you have better things to do!). If there is no light, you can still go to the data and review it. Plus, you then have a record of the temps and pressures for the season and life of the motor to see if the pressure is dropping as the engine ages. 

You can also set yellow lights for warnings. Riding in the draft and coolant starts to get warm - yellow light and a message for what it means. Then you can work on cooling the motor and getting some air. Then their is a red light for too hot, you have to act now. Or maybe it's the last lap, you're in the lead, and it's now a trophy motor!

 

My general plan is to make well thought out alarms so that I can focus on driving and not trying to see what a gauge is doing. If it works for fighter pilots, F1, etc, it will work for me.

 

So, went with your suggestion and got rid of all of the auxiliary lights and almost everything is now in the AiM.  Any suggestions on specific alarm parameters for Oil Pressure and Water Temp?



#7
TrailBrake

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So, went with your suggestion and got rid of all of the auxiliary lights and almost everything is now in the AiM.  Any suggestions on specific alarm parameters for Oil Pressure and Water Temp?

 

I always default to what the engine builder says, but lacking that, it can depend on where the sensor is mounted. For oil pressure, a good rule of thumb is normally 10-15 at idle and min 10 psi per 1k rpm up to 30-40 lbs and then that is good for most engines. Temp really depends on where it is located. On my Porsche, I see 300 F out of the oil galleys and 250 F at the tank with quality synthetic oil. In other cars, it might be 225 F if it's post cooler and with conventional oil. It really depends.


Matt Romanowski

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#8
Sphinx

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I always default to what the engine builder says, but lacking that, it can depend on where the sensor is mounted. For oil pressure, a good rule of thumb is normally 10-15 at idle and min 10 psi per 1k rpm up to 30-40 lbs and then that is good for most engines. Temp really depends on where it is located. On my Porsche, I see 300 F out of the oil galleys and 250 F at the tank with quality synthetic oil. In other cars, it might be 225 F if it's post cooler and with conventional oil. It really depends.

Thanks Matt.

 

If anyone has suggestions for parameters for an SM, I'd appreciate it.

 

The only one that comes to mind is if oil pressure is less than 10psi at over 2000 RPMs, for example.

Temp is being read at the back of the block into the heater core.



#9
38bfast

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we put the alarms at stages. water temp, 205 yellow light message water warm, 215 steady red message water hot, 230 flashing red all LEDs shut car off now. We also combine some, volts below 13.0 and temp above 215 message lost belt. 

 

of course I will get the call on the radio "it says shut car off now. What should I do?" or the Kovak "I don't care I will stay out till it blows up" or the "it said shut car off now so I figured I should be able to make it back to pit lane"


Ralph Provitz
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#10
TrailBrake

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I should have posted this webinar I did with AiM on alarms earlier. It shows much of what 38bfast said. 

 


Matt Romanowski

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#11
ChrisA

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I should have posted this webinar I did with AiM on alarms earlier. It shows much of what 38bfast said. 

Matt, the link does not work.


Chris

 

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#12
TrailBrake

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Let's try again 


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#13
Jeff Wasilko

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We also combine some, volts below 13.0 and temp above 215 message lost belt. 

It's good to have a general warning for low voltage--i've seen alternators fail with low voltage as they got hot....saved a race weekend by spotting low voltage at the end of each test session on Friday.






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