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What air pressure range for Hoosier SMs?

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#21
Jeff Wasilko

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I've found cold pressures between 27-30 and hot between 32-35 worked well for me on the SM6. For comparison, I run RA1s at 36-39 hot, and ran R888s at 32-34 hot.

#22
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Having run Hoosier R and A tires on my ASedan since the day they came out, and the older model for 10 years before that, I might just throw in that I found they were very good for tuning front to rear grip. You can change your handling by dropping or raising the pressures front to rear. Disclaimer, I have not run them on my SM, but would guess that the same would probably be true for the SM tire.
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#23
Muda

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How about camber?
I can't get any more but should it be a little less?
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#24
davecarama

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How about camber?
I can't get any more but should it be a little less?


What camber are you currently at?
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#25
Motor City Hamilton

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You can change your handling by dropping or raising the pressures front to rear.



+1 on Spec Miata. I find them more responsive to a pound of air pressure change than I did the Toyos.

For me, the Hoosier liked about the same amount of camber. I am 3.3 front (maxed out) and 2.5 to 2.8 rear. Mid Ohio seems to like camber. Other tracks I race on call for a tick less, but nothing drastic.

#26
Flyntgr

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"Where are you at?"

If you're asking OP, in Louisiana: hot, humid and drought conditions.

#27
Muda

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I got it Dave, just been busy.
About -3* in the front, -3.25* in the rear.

Remembering that the pirate tires reportedly required significantly less camber due to the stiffer sidewall.
Always found Hoos' pressure recommendations for other applications to be very high.
We'll see.
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#28
Johnny D

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FYI, From Hoosiers site again.

SPEC MIATA BASELINE SET-UP

-3 camber front
-2.5 camber rear
+3 to 5 caster (equal on each side)
Zero toe
Hot Tire PSI @ 38+
Start wet tire pressure 2-4 psi higher than dry pressures

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#29
Flyntgr

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Okay, I have tested in mid to upper 90 degree weather on a short track, 1.8 miles with 14 turns and only one long straight (100-105 mph). I found 33 lbs Hot temp too slippery, with tires getting too hot. But, I also found 37 and 38 lbs too slippery with tire temps too cool, ranging from 155 to 176 degrees, lows to highs. Hoosiers are supposed to like 180-200 according to Manufacturer's information. So...

I now believe 35 or 36 lbs pressure will be the range for Hot temps.

What say you guys? Anyone testing them besides me?

#30
Muda

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So, Hoo's the dealer in the NE? Can't believe I won't be doing business with Joe after all these years.
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#31
Jeff Wasilko

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So, Hoo's the dealer in the NE? Can't believe I won't be doing business with Joe after all these years.

I've bought HooHoos from Joe.

#32
philstireservice

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So, Hoo's the dealer in the NE? Can't believe I won't be doing business with Joe after all these years.




Howdy !!!
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#33
Flyntgr

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Howdy, back at you at Philstireservice. What can you tell us about the hot bracket for SM6's? To get them to 180-200 degrees on a short track in mid 90 degree ambient temps, what is the hot bracket? Any ideas for a '99 SM or otherwise any SM? We'll appreciate some experience here-whether the Miata you know about has been running ITA, ITS, or whatever.... Thanks.

#34
philstireservice

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Howdy, back at you at Philstireservice. What can you tell us about the hot bracket for SM6's? To get them to 180-200 degrees on a short track in mid 90 degree ambient temps, what is the hot bracket? Any ideas for a '99 SM or otherwise any SM? We'll appreciate some experience here-whether the Miata you know about has been running ITA, ITS, or whatever.... Thanks.




Here's what I can tell you from a long time racer me (22 years)....loose is fast. Not falling off the track loose, but a little movement in the rear. It does two things, gets the car to rotate(takes some push away sometimes) and gets the rear tires to operating temps (180-200). If the tires don't get hot enough you might not have grip in them. Another point is, the higher the hot pressure you can handle the faster you will be. Think less rolling resistance. Again, this is a personal preference. But if you are not on the edge you won't be fast. So with all this said I would shoot for 38-40 hot. But like what has been said on here already, you need to approach it slowly. Go pound by pound, not necessarily increasing every session, but maybe twice a weekend. Then write down your data and start from that point at the next event.I can tell you from personal experience that I picked up 4.5 seconds over a 3 month period just from working on air pressure. When I reached a certain comfort level with a certain hot pressure I would kick up the cold starting pressure at the next event and so on. It's like working on that fast turn where you brake when you are learning it, then tap the brakes when you have more confidence, then it's a lift, then you eventually go flat out. It's a progression. This is basically general info. On a short track where the tire may not cool down in between turns, you may have to start it a little lower, but still look for the same hot pressure. Also work on being smoother, not throwing the car, as to not overheat the tire. This might involve changing your turn in a bit. Slow in fast out, all that stuff. There is a sweet spot for Hoosiers as far as temps go. If you don't reach it, no grip, if you exceed it, you loose grip. It will take some getting use to. Hoosiers have a smaller slip angle so they take more precision to drive. They react quicker, so you have to also.

Some food for thought.....
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#35
Flyntgr

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Here's what I can tell you from a long time racer me (22 years)....loose is fast. Not falling off the track loose, but a little movement in the rear. It does two things, gets the car to rotate(takes some push away sometimes) and gets the rear tires to operating temps (180-200). If the tires don't get hot enough you might not have grip in them. Another point is, the higher the hot pressure you can handle the faster you will be. Think less rolling resistance. Again, this is a personal preference. But if you are not on the edge you won't be fast. So with all this said I would shoot for 38-40 hot. But like what has been said on here already, you need to approach it slowly. Go pound by pound, not necessarily increasing every session, but maybe twice a weekend. Then write down your data and start from that point at the next event.I can tell you from personal experience that I picked up 4.5 seconds over a 3 month period just from working on air pressure. When I reached a certain comfort level with a certain hot pressure I would kick up the cold starting pressure at the next event and so on. It's like working on that fast turn where you brake when you are learning it, then tap the brakes when you have more confidence, then it's a lift, then you eventually go flat out. It's a progression. This is basically general info. On a short track where the tire may not cool down in between turns, you may have to start it a little lower, but still look for the same hot pressure. Also work on being smoother, not throwing the car, as to not overheat the tire. This might involve changing your turn in a bit. Slow in fast out, all that stuff. There is a sweet spot for Hoosiers as far as temps go. If you don't reach it, no grip, if you exceed it, you loose grip. It will take some getting use to. Hoosiers have a smaller slip angle so they take more precision to drive. They react quicker, so you have to also.

Some food for thought.....

That sounds like some good experience talking, so I'll try doing what you suggested. Smooth, on the edge slip at apex, but not lots of slip; slow in, fast out. Got it. Now to learn to do it....

#36
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So, Hoo's the dealer in the NE? Can't believe I won't be doing business with Joe after all these years.

I'm still here for all of you NASA teams. Push to keep SSM on Toyo.
I might have to start going to NASA events.
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